A Collection of Rich Web Cards and Banners

Images on web sites call attention. To web content managers, looking for images or web cards appropriate for a post or article has become like routine or standard procedure. Thanks to sites like Pexels and Canva, these online photo and graphic design sites have made my work easier at times when I needed to finish something right away.

Rich Cards

Facebook calls it Open Graph while Twitter calls it Twitter cards. Pinterest calls it rich Pins while Google+ calls it rich Snippet. Simply, web cards are graphics especially designed to capture attention and engage site visitors to your site contents. It functions more than just an image because it contains information called meta tags, which social media sites use to integrate your social site post with your web post or page . It is for that reason why webizens call it rich cards.

My Own Collection of Design Inspirations

The following are some of the header banners, post cards, social site cards and covers, info cards, etc that I have used on a variety of web sites and social media sites. You are free to use any of these graphics. Consider them under CC0 license, which means you can download them for free and use them for whatever purpose without attribution. This is my collection of design inspirations.

Header Banners / Images / Social Site Covers

Web Cards / Blog Featured Images / Social Site Post Cards

Sacrificing Design Elements In Favour Of Client’s Preference

T-shirt print design lent inspired

Design is your pride. You created it from your mind out of nothing. It’s like you are the mother of your design. You carry it in your “womb” then you give birth to it.

Like a mother, no matter how your design looks like, you love it. When you start dressing it up, that’s when you make different versions.

You believe in yourself. You know that you are objective when choosing the best design. But sometimes, you get frustrated when your best pick is ignored.

Yes, it’s true that most of the time you have to sacrifice good design elements over your clients’s preferences. There’s nothing you can do about it but accept it. Anyway, it may be your design but the final output is your clients’s. They paid for it.

Don’t cry over spilled milk. Instead, talk about it. Good thing, in this technological generation, you can blog about just anything. So, go ahead, talk about the design that your clients did not pick.

Elements of Design + Your Style

It’s true that in designing, you observe the good elements of design. Plus, you add your own style to give it a character that is uniquely yours or that can be identified to you. From time to time, you violate a few elements to make it alternative or something like “exotic.” Breaking some traditional elements is a brave thing to do to creating your own style.

My Typical Style or Design Preferences

This is one of the design I recently made for an organisation. It is a design to be printed on the upper left of a beige, khaki, or taupe tee shirt.

In this design, to the best of my ability, I tried to apply design elements such as colour harmony, balance, and focus.

The large text Visita Iglesia gives focus. It is what it is all about. The rest are just bells and whistles, but necessary to create impact and attractiveness.

The dark chocolate bar gives emphasis to the word Iglesia because it is the more important word than visita. It also balances the existence of all elements as a whole, and to complement the round insignia.

The map background, though serves as aesthetic, is included to convey a journey or a travel. The event after all is about a travel, which is a pilgrimage. The details of the map are softened and blurred because they are not important to the design. Instead, it emphasised seven location points in the map which are the destinations of the pilgrimage.

The mocha background (which should be the colour of the textile) blends with the design to exude harmony. After all, the theme is about communion of communities. Moreover, the colour blend projects some expensive taste.

My style is simple and minimalist. My reason for that is to communicate effectively the message that I want to convey. If there are too many elements in a design, it creates confusion.

I also prefer related hues or monochromatic. Nothing loud, bright or vibrant. A bit desaturated or hazy, and soft. I like my design peaceful.

How This Design Has Evolved

It is common for a client to request adding other elements such as insignias, images and texts to your original design. Much as you didn’t like it, you have to sacrifice some design elements. Following next, I demonstrate how my original design has evolved into something that is not my personal preference.

Version 2

The client requested adding some texts. In order not to sacrifice some elements of design, this is what I did. Though I softened the text powered by peaceworks103 in order not to steal the main idea, that space looks crowded. So, I created another option.

Design inspiration Visita Iglesia

Version 3

The client suggested positioning the added text around the insignia. It looked better than version 2; but the client requested further adding more texts.

Design inspiration year of the parish

Version 4

In this version, visita iglesia is mentioned twice which is a big no-no in a design. As much as I wanted to avoid redundancy, I had no choice but to submit to the client’s preference.

However, the client further requested that peaceworks103 be around the border of the insignia.

Design inspiration Communion of Communities

The Final Verdict

I didn’t want the additional text to be around the insignia as well. That will be too much. So, instead, I positioned peaceworks103 inside the insignia. However, it left the dark chocolate bar empty, and therefore meaningless. I would like to retain it to maintain balance but I had to sacrifice that design element. As a result, it left that lower part of the design bare and too much useless space.

Design inspiration Peaceworks

But I had not choice. This is what the client picked. Some design elements sacrificed in favour of the client’s preferences.

Take a look at the designs in this slide show.

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Movie Posters Design Examples

These are 8 movie posters I designed for an event, which had a film festival theme. The event was for a rotary club induction of officers. The challenge was to make the movie posters relevant to the rotary club. I did some research on the areas of focus of the rotary, its core values, and the local projects that this rotary club had accomplished.

All the films presented in the design are fictitious. They do not pertain to any particular film or documentary. The movie titles were all made up except for A Star Is Born and Mulawin, which happened to have movies of the same title. I insisted on using these titles because they are relevant to the club. If the other titles I used happened to be of the same titles of existing movies, it was not intentional. The name of the actors, movie reviews, and reviewers’ names were all fictional.

If you happen to be a Rotarian who is viewing this, can you guess what the posters are trying to depict?